If trees could talk

I live in a land of timber. How could a simple tree impress a Canadian? But many times on our recent trip to England we stopped to marvel at the wonder of a tree.

Like this giant one at Winston Churchill’s Chartwell estate.

Giant Japanese cedar at Chartwell

We asked the gardener to repeat the name of this tree several times. She stuck with the Latin, which we think was Cryptomeria japonica. (Would it have been too much to ask for her to say simply Japanese cedar?)

And this scenic one at Hampstead Heath.

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But my favourite was this one. This tree could begin talking to me at any second and impart to me grand wisdom about life. I think this tree is telling me to stay rooted in what’s important because I already have everything I need, and to breathe.

What do you think?

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About Arlene Somerton Smith

Writer, laughing thinker, miner of inspirational insights, sports fan, and community volunteer

Posted on November 6, 2018, in Arlene Smith, Arlene Somerton Smith, Inspiration, Living life to the fullest, modern faith, progressive christianity, spirituality and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 11 Comments.

  1. We encountered some wonderful trees in British Columbia, especially in the Vancouver area. These beat all. Thanks for posting such splendor!

    • I agree. The incredible trees out west are jaw-dropping in their magnificence. I am grateful to have been in their presence on visits. Even the oldest and biggest of the trees in Ottawa where I live are much smaller. Sometimes setting and character are important too. The right tree with the right quirky bend against the right backdrop can be quite compelling.

  2. Wonderful photos of wonder-filled trees. If only they could talk!

  3. Beautiful tree photos Arlene. They are magnificent! I often take. Photo from the ground up into the canopy of special ones when I travel. And if they could talk with all the decades of history!

  4. That massive ?oak? is amazing, enough to inspire anyone. Roots may matter, but wings matter more. And breathe.

  5. Phyllis Bohonis

    I look at the twisted limbs, wrinkles and scars in these old behemoths and see character, strength and survival – just as is carved in many human beings we encounter.

  6. Wow! I think you have figured out “tree language” perfectly. It’s amazing what roots and branches swayinging with the breeze can tell us. 💚

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