The ground and the seed

I ponder the parable of the seed scattered on good or poor ground. (See below.)

Like any respectable parable, it can be interpreted a number of ways. Perhaps we are the “farmer.” If so, we need to choose carefully where we spread our “seed”—our ideas, our time, our friendships. Don’t share ideas with an audience that won’t appreciate them, don’t waste time on pointless endeavours, and don’t choose friends who choke out your potential. Or perhaps God (the universe, nature, Yahweh, Allah, whatever) is the “farmer” and we are the “seed.” If so, some of us have a tougher time of it—through no fault of our own—just because of the environment where we are born. Others—lucky sods—happen to land on roomy, fertile ground.

But I wonder. Why do we always put the onus on the ground?

The poor ground is just being what it was created to be. The footpath doesn’t sprout seed, but it makes the going easy for the feet that tread upon it.

Georgian Bay rock

Georgian Bay rock – Beautiful and perfect in its own way.

The rocks of Georgian Bay near my cottage don’t welcome scattered seed—carrots would not sprout there, nor would lush lettuce leaves. But it has perfect nooks for evergreens and moss, and its granite craters pool water for birds to drink. It is not bad; it is beautiful and rugged, mineral-rich and solid. Best of all, it is not trying to be something it’s not, gripped with angst about why it can’t grow tomato plants like its cousin, the rich farmland.

sprouts

Sprouts in rich farmland – Beautiful and perfect in their own way.

And what about that loamy earth of a tilled field? How would moss manage there? The bright sunshine and the working of the soil would kill it. As judged by the moss, the rich, loamy soil of a southern Ontario tomato field would be “bad.”

Plants or soil aren’t really good or bad. They just have to match, that’s all—the right soil for the right plant.

People are like that too. Women of action sitting behind desks, or scholarly men digging ditches are like seeds scattered on the wrong ground.

They start to believe there’s something wrong with them. Their bosses air frustrations about their inadequacies. They believe they are deficient in some way. They tell themselves they need to change. All they need is the right ground.

Moss clings to the shady sides of rock, corn sprouts from the arable land: A plant for every kind of ground, and a ground for every kind of plant. All are beautiful in their own way.

They just have to match, that’s all.

_______________

Matthew 13:3-8

He [Jesus] told many stories in the form of parables, such as this one: “Listen! A farmer went out to plant some seeds. As he scattered them across his field, some seeds fell on a footpath, and the birds came and ate them. Other seeds fell on shallow soil with underlying rock. The seeds sprouted quickly because the soil was shallow. But the plants soon wilted under the hot sun, and since they didn’t have deep roots, they died. Other seeds fell among thorns that grew up and choked out the tender plants. Still other seeds fell on fertile soil, and they produced a crop that was thirty, sixty, and even a hundred times as much as had been planted!

6 thoughts on “The ground and the seed

  1. Phyllis Bohonis

    Don’t ever hesitate pressing “Publish”, Arlene. Like the seeds in the parable your blogs are going to be received and blossom or not, depending on the openness of the mind receiving them. I am thrilled so often to view the world we live in through your eyes.

    Reply
  2. Arlene Somerton Smith Post author

    Ah, Phyllis, thank you. Curiously, I hadn’t thought of my blog posts as seeds! You’re quite right. A good reminder.
    I read your book – your seed – this past weekend – pretty much in one sitting. Well done! You took me lots of places I didn’t expect to go.

    Reply

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